UN World Water Day

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The World Water Day

What will happen if there will be no more clean drinking water? It sounds like something fantastic to us, but, unfortunately, this is a common situation for every third human in the world, as only 1% of the world’s water is safe for drinking.

Every year, on March 22, the World Water Day is celebrated around the world. This idea originated in 1992 at the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development in Rio de Janeiro, and in the same year the UN General Assembly adopted a resolution declaring March 22 of each year as the World Water Day. Its purpose is to draw attention to the availability and quality of water and to remind everyone of its value.

The World Water Day reminds us of necessity to preserve and care for the water resources of our planet, because nowadays 2 billion people are forced to live without access to safe water. This day is aimed to actions to be taken to overcome the global water crisis and is part of an international campaign to achieve universal water supply and sanitation by 2030.

The World Water Day 2022

Each year, a specific theme is chosen for World Water Day. This year’s motto is “Groundwater - Make the Invisible Visible”. This motto is a reminder of a valuable resource that is literally under our feet.

Groundwater is invisible, but it is a hidden treasure that enriches our lives. In the driest parts of the world, they can be the only water available to humans. Nearly all of the world’s fresh water is groundwater, which affects water supply, sanitation, agriculture, industry and ecosystems. Groundwater is connected to almost all ecosystems: rivers, lakes and swamps exchange water directly with underground layers, plants use the water available in the ground.

In future, groundwater will become crucial resource for our adaptation to the coming climate change. And while people in many countries nowadays are overuse and pollute groundwater, the United Nations initiative aims to ensure that we learn to be responsible and to cooperate with each other to properly manage this valuable resource.

What will happen if there will be no more clean drinking water? It sounds like something fantastic to us, but, unfortunately, this is a common situation for every third human in the world, as only 1% of the world’s water is safe for drinking.

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